Of all the violations of storytelling rules in Stanley Kubrick’s films, my favorite can only be the film’s 2001 premiere: Space Odyssey. The first ten minutes are absolutely devoid of dialogue and show prehistoric primates for a mysterious monolith in the deserts of Africa, tuned to the music of Strauss, to which the language of Zarathustra belongs. After getting acquainted with the monolith, they learn how to use animal bones as tools. This serves as a prologue to a film inflammation in which a similar monolith appears on the surface of the moon in a futuristic year. 2001 !

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The events and meaning of the film largely depend on its interpretation, making it one of the most unique science fiction performances. It is not surprising that this story has been compared with other regions of Utah and now with Romania, where visually similar metal monoliths have appeared. If you’re here, you’ve probably heard the story of these 2.5 meter long pieces of metal appearing in these places without a clear indication of their purpose or who placed them there.

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At first I thought about going deeper into it and taking it very seriously, but I don’t know what I can do. A lot of people on the internet have already looked at this and I generally agree with them. It’s probably some kind of advertisement for a new technology or an emerging film.

The person behind this campaign is clearly trying to exploit our tendency to panic. In the past year we have lived in a state of increased tension and hysteria and it seems to be the only natural way to enjoy it.

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I’d like to believe that we’ve been visited by an alien race beyond our understanding – and I know what you usually say: If there was a year for that, it would be 2020! And that may be true, but that’s what someone who runs some kind of viral marketing campaign around these things would say. We are as close to becoming as the Yahoos in 1938, who would actually have believed that Orson Welles had read The War of the Worlds (of course, the true extent of hysteria is often exaggerated). Why do I feel that in 80 years people will be talking about the time that Alon Mask or whoever started placing these huge pieces of metal anywhere in the world, and people fell in love with him because they thought it was the beginning of some kind of great alien invasion, when in reality most people just saw the story, said Oh, that’s weird, and just continued their day.

Perhaps the clearest sign that this is a complete fable is the fact that this thing was found on U.S. soil and not immediately confiscated by the U.S. government. Yeah, we’re in transition, but if you think they’re not involved, you’re wrong.

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Now that I’m finishing this message, I realize it doesn’t make much sense to reproduce the feelings of the tweets above; man, can we put it behind us? This has been an exhausting year, so let’s summarize this nonsense and move on.

What do you think of these monoliths?

Here we go:

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