We finally reached the last character appearing in Happy!, and also the only one who makes his debut in the second episode, What Smiles Are For. Here, in need of cash and guns, Nick Sax convinces Happy to stop to a poker game held by his old “pal” LeDic, portrayed by Michael Maize, an arms dealer and his old acquaintance. Despite cheating on him and killing all his play pals, LeDic comes back in Season 2 to help Sax infiltrate one of Sonny Shine‘s costumed orgies. In the comics, the character’s name is spelled LeDeek, while LeDic is only the mocking nickname Sax gives him, and he doesn’t survive his encounter with the hitman. Let’s see together.

LeDeek was a cajun who tried his fortune on the East Coast, and moved to New York City, where he could start a new enterprise anew… specifically, an illegal gambling house he personally ran. In his line of work, he met all kinds of people: the Italian assassin Gerry Fratelli, the drunken hitman Nick Sax, the Italian trafficker Mr. Ludovico, the Hebrew arms dealer Applebaum… all of them came to his poker table, eventually, and LeDeek praised himself of being able to read them all, understanding their “tells”, as he called them, the subconscious signals to be found in body language and to be interpreted to own the game. From time to time, however, even he lost, and even someone like Nick Sax, constantly high, uncivilized and without a shed of luck in his entire life, managed to win a couple thousand dollars. Once. The poker nights at LeDeek’s were an event in the underworld, a place where anybody could come to win some money without anybody asking questions… and that’s why Mr. Blue contacted LeDeek the night his nephews, the Fratelli Brothers, were killed by Sax. He was sure that the hitman would have showed up, looking for cash, and he instructed LeDeek on stalling him for as long as his men took to get to his place, in exchange of the bounty on Sax’s head. LeDeek didn’t believe Sax would have been this stupid, but he was wrong: that night, Nick Sax sat at the table, on Gerry Fratelli’s now empty chair.

As usual, Sax was high on booze and drugs, and immediately gave the best of his racism and vulgarity to the people at the table. LeDeek and the others played coy, pretending they didn’t know why Sax was so sure to have the cash to play in his pocket. As a first wager, LeDeek even accepted Sax’s golden wedding ring, mocking him for being so desperate. Things, however, immediately started to get stranger than usual: Sax’s eyes moved everywhere in the room, and he talked to himself. LeDeek believed he had won the ring with a full boat with ladies, but Sax beat it with four jacks, a hand LeDeek had not read in his body language. Something was off, but Sax mocked him, telling he had a little blue horse that spied on their cards. LeDeek tried to distract him and to mine his certainties, and for a while it seemed to work… but somehow Sax was able to read his bluff and to win also the following round. As he got the money he wanted, Sax was about to leave, but LeDeek insisted for another hand… then he insisted at gun point. He told Sax that Blue knew he was there, and that he wouldn’t have gotten far. As an answer, Sax drew a pen from his pocket… and used it to murder everyone in the room. LeDeek was found minutes later by Detective McCarthy with a hole in his forehead: most definitely, he had been dealt with the worst hand in his life.

LeDeek is a professional criminal, a gambler, a dealer, and probably a lot more. With his kind of work, he knows everything and everyone there is to know, and is always up to date with what’s happening in the city’s underground, using the information to always be a step ahead of everyone else. Intelligent and manipulative, there is a reason, after all, for which LeDeek is still alive, despite winning money away from criminals for a living…

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